WiLD Leaders Celebrates Annie Barthel’s Next Step

WiLD Leaders Celebrates Annie Barthel’s Next Step

Today was Annie Barthel’s last day working officially on the WiLD Leaders team before she transitions to her new role at Slalom Consulting. Annie has served as one of our Promotions Specialists for the last year, and while we are going to miss Annie, we are so excited for the next place she is going to serve. Annie has been a blessing to WiLD Leaders not only because of her tremendous competence, but because of her character. Annie is what I would describe as a nuclear accelerated learner. It is unbelievable to imagine that the Annie I met over two years ago is the same Annie I know today. While her character is the same, she has been on a rocket ship of learning – developing a keen sense for marketing with an uncanny ability to put herself in the shoes of others. She has taken a fundamental gift in writing and developed that into a discerning and conscientious voice for WiLD Leaders. And, she thinks strategically at a very early stage in her career, is decisive and simply gets it done on point and on mission. She’s moving on to an awesome opportunity at Slalom Consulting, and we are just so excited for her.

When we asked her some of the snapshots of what’s she’s learned during her time at WiLD Leaders she said:

  1. Always remember the importance of the “why” and the “who” behind what you are doing. This keeps you on track with your mission and vision, and is GOOD FOR YOUR HEART!
  2. Having a clearly defined mission and vision statement that all team members understand helps keep everyone aligned and keeps us fighting well.
  3. If your boss calls all the employees freaks, it’s not necessarily a bad thing.
  4. One off self-awareness tools that only tell you what you are good at or your matching spirit animal always leave you wanting more. And, there is more.
  5. Having a team that has each other’s backs is a differentiator.
  6. I learned the Indian head wobble.
  7. Networking and marketing/promoting don’t have to be awkward or feel selfish. It can be beneficial for all parties, especially when it’s the right people.
  8. Having research behind your product is legit and important.
  9. Starting off meetings doing a ten minute catch up is not a waste of time. It brings the team closer, and at the end of the day, makes everything more enjoyable.
  10. Always have snacks on hand in case the team gets on a roll.
  11. Always refer to all the assessments in the WiLD Toolkit as tools when Allison Screen is around, because that’s what they are:)

When we asked her what she’s most excited for in her next opportunity she said, “First, I’m looking forward to diving into the world of training and development. Learning from experienced people who work on learning in different contexts is very exciting to me. Second, I’m really excited to continue working for an organization that cares deeply about their clients and their employees. I can already tell they think about the why and who behind their work. And finally, I’m looking forward to stepping outside my comfort zone into a field I’m excited about and in a challenging role where I can develop and contribute to a team that is passionate and excited about what they do.”

Annie, you make everyone better when you are in the room. You are conscientious, committed, smart on the spot, aware of others, productive, fun, and generally awesome. You are that weird and rare example of a sacrificial and strong leader all at the same time. We will always consider you a true WiLD leader and are so excited for your new team at Slalom. Lead on!

Rob McKenna

CEO and Founder, WiLD Leaders Inc.


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